Reading 1, Acts 10:34, 37-43
Responsorial Psalm, Psalms 118:1-2, 16-17, 22-23
Reading 2, Colossians 3:1-4
Gospel, John 20:1-9

Alleluia, He is Risen! The Resurrection is the single most important event in human history. It exists as pivotal moment of Christ’s defeat over death and sin accomplished upon the Cross. This solemnity and start of Eastertide come to as at the end of a long Lent (the Great Fast to our Eastern brethren) and in this way Easter (Pascha) is a joyous occasion, as we all know.

“They did not yet understand,” rings the end of today’s Gospel from St. Mark. St. Peter and the other disciple did not yet understand when they saw the empty tomb. St. Peter had denied Christ three times on Holy Thursday, been absent from the Crucifixion of Good Friday, and had remained in hiding to this Easter Sunday. He had allowed sin to defeat him, fill him with sorrow, and accepted that even his Lord could die.

How true is this of our own spiritual lives and our struggle with sanctification? When we fall into sin, are met with despairing events, and find our faith tried, we can become weak in the theological virtue of hope. It is at that point that we must turn to the Cross and see how it stands still as the whole world turns around it.

The Resurrection is a conquering of death that took place in the current realm. The conquering of death for us men, until the Second Coming of Christ, comes in Sainthood after our deaths. We conquer death, by God’s grace, through repentance from sin, good works, and faith. In short, we die to ourselves and are metaphorically resurrected in living holy lives, as well as, through the Beatific Vision.

As went enter this years Paschaltide, let us reflect on both the joy of Our Lord’s victory and the life and joy we too are called to should we bear the yoke of the Cross like Christ.

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